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At long last… Spring (maybe)

After winter overstayed its welcome with daily temperatures ten degrees cooler than average, we had our first taste of Spring on a fine Good Friday.  To my delight, my first bud of awakening appeared in the form of a crocus.

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The snowdrops I planted two years ago, alas, never bloomed, so I am doubly excited for my little ones.

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Up come my 2013 sprouts

After a seemingly never-ending winter, I found the lovely sprouts peaking through the ground this afternoon.  Only a mere two weeks ago, I had a school snow day, thinking Spring was weeks away, but these little hyacinths give me hope. Despite the continuing snow, Spring may not be “in the air” but “in the ground”.

Note the photo was taken in 17 degree temps, minus wind chill. Oh, Spring, where art thou?
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Daffodils in November

Our Midwest 9 degrees cooler than average October followed by a few balmy weekends has confused my poor daffodils.
Back, I say! Get back in the ground! I should be anticipating your March-April arrival, not clearing you out with the autumn leaves.
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Rooftop Gardening Done Right

Atop Elgin Community College’s first floor rooftops, I found these lovely (and quite large) student-led gardens just outside the new Humanities lunchroom.  Apparently, the horticulture students maintain the plantings, and the culinary students use the produce in their cuisine.  What a lovely idea!
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And, of course, it is a serene view when I am scarfing my Lean Cuisine between classes.

Sweet Autumn Explosion

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My Sweet Autumn Clematis has exploded with blooms.  This perennial vine is designated a “Type 3”, meaning it must be cut to the ground each Fall or early Spring as it only blooms on new wood.  
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Each year, I’m surprised by the voracity of this plant: going from nothing to covering my stairwell in a matter of months.
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Catmint: My cats’ high

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My cats’ favorite plant purchase has to be catmint. Rapunzel (along with many a neighborhood stray) spends all Summer rolling through these amazingly resilient perennials. I even snip off a few bits for the indoor cats who treat it like Christmas. I’ve attempted growing catnip now three times, but it’s always eaten to the roots the day after planting. Catmint, on the other hand, is an almost unkillable, freshly-scented perennial that seems to bloom unfettered early Spring until late Fall “cut back”.

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If I didn’t have cats (oh, what a tragedy!), I’d love to snip some happy blooms for a country-style bouquet; alas, my kitties would smash the vase to get their “kitty high on”.